PLENARISTAS


Advanced process control

Sigurd Skogestad - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Noruega
Fecha y Hora: Miércoles 13 de octubre a las 9h. Tiempo del Centro de México = UTC/GMT (CNM) – 5

Lugar: Online
Resumen:
Control engineers rely on many tools, and although some people may think that in the future there will be one general universal tool that solves all problems, like model predictive control, this is not likely to happen. The main reason is that the possible benefits of using more general tools may not be worth the increased implementation costs (including modelling efforts) compared to using simpler "conventional" advanced process control (APC) solutions. In particular, this applies to process control, where each process is often unique. In addition, for a new process, a model is usually not available, so at least for the initial period of operation a conventional scheme must be implemented. Conventional APC includes the “advanced” standard control elements that typically are provided at the DCS (distributed control system) level and which industry commonly uses to enhance control when simple single-loop PID controllers do not give acceptable control performance. Examples of such control elements are cascade control, selectors (override), split range control, input or valve position control (VPC), multiple controllers (and MVs) for the same CV, and nonlinear calculation blocks (including nonlinear feedforward and decoupling and linearizing adaptive gain elements). Since its introduction in the 1940’s, about 80 years ago, conventional APC has largely been overlooked by the academic community, yet it is still thriving in industrial practice, even after 40 years with MPC. So, it seems safe to predict that conventional APC (including PID control) will not be replaced by MPC, but will remain in the toolbox along with MPC. The goal of this talk is to take a systematic view on how to design a conventional APC system. The starting point is the plantwide optimal steady-state economic operation, with focus on constraints.
Biografía:
Sigurd Skogestad received his Ph.D. degree from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA in 1987. He has been a full professor at Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway since 1987. He is the principal author, together with Prof. Ian Postlethwaite, of the book "Multivariable feedback control" published by Wiley in 1996 (first edition) and 2005 (second edition). His research interests include the use of feedback as a tool to make the system well-behaved (including self-optimizing control), limitations on performance in linear systems, control structure design and plantwide control, interactions between process design and control, and distillation column design, control and dynamics. His other main interests are mountain skiing (cross country), orienteering (running around with a map) and grouse hunting. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (2012) and IFAC (2014).

Retos y Avances de la Tecnología de un Control Seguro

Cristina Verde - Instituto de Ingeniería-UNAM, México
Fecha y Hora: Miércoles 13 de octubre a las 15h. Tiempo del Centro de México = UTC/GMT (CNM) – 5

Lugar: Online
Resumen:
En la actualidad, los procesos físicos operan conjuntamente con software formando sistemas complejos para satisfacer especificaciones de diseño con múltiples lazos de control, clases de variables, y garantizando normas de seguridad. Este avance de la tecnología con el cual se ha logrado seguimiento de trayectorias y optimización de sistemas en tiempo real, obliga a considerar esquemas automáticos de supervisión y predicción de eventos incorporados al sistema de control, a través de sensores no necesariamente usados para el control. La presentación está enfocada al diseño del supervisor y el control tolerante a fallas de sistemas complejos, estableciendo como parte de las tareas de un control seguro la seguridad física y la cibernética. Como aplicaciones específicas se presenta el caso de una central eléctrica de ciclo combinado y el de un sistema de generación de energía eléctrica a partir de oleaje del mar.

An introduction to prognostics and health management: Decision-making based on Knowledge about the Future

Marcos Orchard - Universidad de Chile, Chile
Fecha y Hora: Jueves 14 de octubre a las 9h. Tiempo del Centro de México = UTC/GMT (CNM) – 5

Lugar: Online
Resumen:
This talk explores the fundamentals of the discipline of Prognostics and Health Management (PHM), with emphasis on the problem of characterizing the probability of critical failure events and how to use this information in the context of Prognostic Decision-Making.
Biografía:
Dr. Marcos Orchard is Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering at Universidad de Chile and former member of the Intelligent Control Systems Laboratory at The Georgia Institute of Technology. His current research interests are the design and implementation of real-time machine learning algorithms for system identification, fault diagnosis, and failure prognostics. His research work at the Georgia Institute of Technology was the foundation of novel real-time fault diagnosis and failure prognostics approaches based on particle filtering algorithms. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from The Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, in 2005 and 2007, respectively. He received his B.S. degree (1999) and a Civil Industrial Engineering degree with Electrical Major (2001) from Catholic University of Chile. The quality of the research conducted by Dr. Marcos Orchard has been widely recognized by researchers in several centers of excellence (NASA Ames Research Center, CALCE - University of Maryland, Tarbes National School of Engineering, University of Waterloo), and especially by the Prognostics and Health Management Society (PHMS) with the distinction "PHMS Fellow" for his significant contributions to the state of the art of the discipline for more than 15 years, his impact on innovation, creativity and leadership demonstrated in his professional work. This has been endorsed by a clear positive trend regarding the number of citations associated with his prolific published work (more than 100 articles, 50 of them in mainstream indexed journals, 1618 citations and h-index 22 (Researcher ID), h-index 32 (Google Scholar), as for awards given by independent analysis groups, such as SAGE Publications USA and “Research Interfaces”, which have highlighted the value and quality of the research conducted in Chile. Dr. Orchard is Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Prognostic and Health Management (ISSN 2153-2648).

Data driven techniques for process control and optimization

Martin Guay - Queen’s University, Canadá
Fecha y Hora: Jueves 14 de octubre a las 15h. Tiempo del Centro de México = UTC/GMT (CNM) – 5

Lugar: Online
Resumen:
Biografía:
Martin Guay (M’03–SM’18)) received the Ph.D. degree from Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, in 1996. He is currently a Professor with the Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen’s University. His current research interests include nonlinear control systems, especially extremum-seeking control, nonlinear model predictive control, adaptive estimation and control, and geometric control. Dr. Guay was a recipient of the Syncrude Innovation Award, the D. G. Fisher from the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers, and the Premier Research Excellence Award. He is a Senior Editor of IEEE Control Systems Letters. He is the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Process Control. He is also an Associate Editor for Automatica, the IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, the Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, and Nonlinear Analysis: Hybrid Systems.

Autonomous Control and the Future of Human Spaceflight

Julia Badger - NASA, EUA
Fecha y Hora: Viernes 15 de octubre a las 9h. Tiempo del Centro de México = UTC/GMT (CNM) – 5

Lugar: Online
Resumen:
As humans look to explore the solar system beyond low Earth orbit, the technology advancements required point heavily towards autonomy. The operation of complex human spacecraft has thus far been solved with heavy human involvement- full ground control rooms and nearly constantly inhabited spacecraft. As the goal of space exploration moves to beyond the International Space Station, the physical and budgetary constraints of business as usual become overwhelming. A new paradigm of delivering spacecraft and other assets capable of self-maintenance and self-operation prior to launching crew solves many problems- and at the same time, it opens up an array of interesting control problems. This talk will focus on robotic and autonomous vehicle system control development efforts that support the new concepts of human exploration of the solar system.
Biografía:
Dr. Julia Badger is the Autonomy and Vehicle Systems Manager (VSM) system manager for the Gateway program at NASA-Johnson Space Center. She also serves as the Autonomous Systems Technical Discipline Lead for JSC. She is responsible for the research and development of autonomous system capabilities, on the Earth, the International Space Station, the Gateway, and for future exploration, that include dexterous manipulation, autonomous spacecraft control and caretaking, and human-robot interfaces. Julia has a BS from Purdue University, and an MS and PhD from the California Institute of Technology, all in Mechanical Engineering. Her work has been honored with several awards, including NASA Software of the Year, Early Career, Director’s Commendation, and Exceptional Achievement Awards.